Greenwashing refers to the practice of gaining an unfair competitive advantage by marketing a financial product as environmentally friendly, when in fact basic environmental standards have not been met (Recital 11 of the Regulation (EU) 2020/852 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 18 June 2020 on the establishment of a framework to facilitate sustainable investment, and amending Regulation (EU) 2019/2088 - Taxonomy Regulation).


 

 

In more detail, according to new rules financial market participants offering ‘green’ financial products will have to:

 

  • disclose how they reach their environmental sustainability target under the Regulation (EU) 2019/2088 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 27 November 2019 on sustainability‐related disclosures in the financial services sector (Sustainable Finance Disclosure Regulation (SFDR) – having some freedom in how to best describe their environmental investment strategies;

 

  • reference the EU taxonomy when describing the degree of ‘greenness’ of the given product.

 
This is intended to introduce an element of comparability, without prejudging those green investments that do not contain underlying economic activities from the EU taxonomy.

  

 

 

quote  

 
 
ESAs Joint Consultation Paper, ESG disclosures, Draft regulatory technical standards with regard to the content, methodologies and presentation of disclosures pursuant to Article 2a, Article 4(6) and (7), Article 8(3), Article 9(5), Article 10(2) and Article 11(4) of Regulation (EU) 2019/2088, JC 2020 1, 23 April 2020, p. 10, 11

 

The ESAs are aware that the accusation of greenwashing might be connected with some ESG strategies, for example “best-in-class” which is typically defined as “focusing on investing in companies that perform better on ESG issues than their peers do”. This approach could make it possible for financial market participants to include companies in a financial product according to Article 8 which might be regarded as unsustainable or “brown” by end-investors. For this reason, the website disclosure requirements were considered important for product manufacturers to disclose information about methodology and data sources

 


 

 

Regulation (EU) 2020/852 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 18 June 2020 on the establishment of a framework to facilitate sustainable investment, and amending Regulation (EU) 2019/2088, Recital 11

 

Making available financial products which pursue environmentally sustainable objectives is an effective way of channelling private investments into sustainable activities. Requirements for marketing financial products or corporate bonds as environmentally sustainable investments, including requirements set by Member States and the Union to allow financial market participants and issuers to use national labels, aim to enhance investor confidence and awareness of the environmental impact of those financial products or corporate bonds, to create visibility and to address concerns about ‘greenwashing’. In the context of this Regulation, greenwashing refers to the practice of gaining an unfair competitive advantage by marketing a financial product as environmentally friendly, when in fact basic environmental standards have not been met. Currently, a few Member States have labelling schemes in place. Those existing schemes build on different classification systems for environmentally sustainable economic activities. Given the political commitments under the Paris Agreement and at Union level, it is likely that more and more Member States will establish labelling schemes or impose other requirements on financial market participants or issuers in respect of promoting financial products or corporate bonds as environmentally sustainable. In such cases, Member States would use their own national classification systems for the purposes of determining which investments qualify as sustainable. If those national labelling schemes or requirements use different criteria to determine which economic activities qualify as environmentally sustainable, investors would be discouraged from investing across borders due to difficulties in comparing different investment opportunities. In addition, economic operators that wish to attract investment from across the Union would have to meet different criteria in different Member States in order for their activities to qualify as environmentally sustainable. The absence of uniform criteria would therefore increase costs and significantly disincentivise economic operators from accessing cross-border capital markets for the purposes of sustainable investment.

 

Recital 9 draft Taxonomy Regulation

https://data.consilium.europa.eu/doc/document/ST-14970-2019-ADD-1/en/pdf


(9) Offering financial products which pursue environmentally sustainable objectives is an effective way of channelling private investments into sustainable activities. National requirements for marketing financial products or corporate bonds as environmentally sustainable investments, including the requirements set out by Member States and the Union to allow the relevant market actors to use a national label, aim to enhance investor confidence and awareness of environmental impact, to create visibility and to address concerns about “greenwashing”. Greenwashing refers to the practice of gaining an unfair competitive advantage by marketing a financial product as environmentally friendly, when in fact it does not meet basic environmental standards. Currently a few Member States have in place labelling schemes. Those existing schemes build on different taxonomies classifying environmentally sustainable economic activities. Given the political commitments under the Paris Agreement and at Union level, it is likely that more and more Member States will establish labelling schemes or other requirements on financial market participants or issuers in respect of financial products or corporate bonds marketed as environmentally sustainable. In doing so, Member States would be using their own national taxonomies for the purposes of determining which investments qualify as sustainable. If such national requirements are based on different criteria as to which economic activities qualify as environmentally sustainable, investors will be discouraged from investing across borders, due to difficulties in comparing different investment opportunities. In addition, economic operators wishing to attract investment from across the Union would have to meet different criteria in the various Member States in order for their activities to qualify as environmentally sustainable for the purposes of those different labels. The absence of uniform criteria will thus increase costs and create a significant disincentive for economic operators, amounting to an impediment to access cross-border capital markets for sustainable investments.
The criteria for determining whether an economic activity is environmentally sustainable should be harmonised at Union level, in order to remove barriers to the functioning of the internal market with regard to raising funds for sustainable projects, and prevent their future emergence. With such harmonisation economic operators will find it easier to raise funding for their environmentally sustainable activities across borders, as their economic activities can be compared against uniform criteria in order to be selected as underlying assets for environmentally sustainable investments. It will therefore facilitate attracting investment across borders within the Union.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 chronicle   Regulatory chronicle

 

  

 

 

22 June 2020

 

Regulation (EU) 2020/852 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 18 June 2020 on the establishment of a framework to facilitate sustainable investment, and amending Regulation (EU) 2019/2088 published in the Official Journal of the EU

 

23 April 2020

 

ESAs Joint Consultation Paper, ESG disclosures, Draft regulatory technical standards with regard to the content, methodologies and presentation of disclosures pursuant to Article 2a, Article 4(6) and (7), Article 8(3), Article 9(5), Article 10(2) and Article 11(4) of Regulation (EU) 2019/2088, JC 2020 16

 

 

 

 IMG 0744   Documentation

 

 

 


 

 

Regulation (EU) 2020/852 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 18 June 2020 on the establishment of a framework to facilitate sustainable investment, and amending Regulation (EU) 2019/2088 (Taxonomy Regulation)

 

 

 

clip2   Links

 

 

 

 

Sustainable finance