EIC Code
European Union Electricity Market Glossary

 


 

 

Energy Identification Coding scheme (EIC) is used by the ENTSO-E, ENTSOG and the EU energy market participants to identify objects in the energy infrastructure like (the list non-exhaustive):


- system operators, traders, producers, consumers, power exchanges, grid operators, suppliers, agents, service providers, etc.,

 

- local grids where metering points are situated, market balance areas consisting of a number of local grids, control areas, etc.,


- cross border connections, metering points, settlement or accounting points, etc.,


- any object that generates, or consumes energy,


- the physical lines that connect adjacent market (balance) areas or internal lines within an area,


- the physical or logical places where an identified object or the IT system of an identified object is or could be located,


- substations for electrical nodes (stations, passive nodes, etc.). 

 

 

Structure for the EIC management

 

 

EIC system is managed through a means of a four level structure, with the involvement of EIC Participants, Local Issuing Offices (LIO), Central Issuing Offices (CIO) and ENTSO-E.


Level 1: EIC Participant


EIC Participant is a physical or legal entity which is allocated one or several EIC code(s) by an authorised LIO.

 

The quality of being “EIC Participant” applies as soon as an entity applies for an EIC code.

 

The EIC Participant submits a request for an EIC code for an identifying party or for an object.


The role of the EIC Participant consists in providing the LIO with the information necessary for the EIC code creation and all necessary updates.


Level 2: Local Issuing Office (LIO)

 

Each country, which directly or indirectly is a part of the European energy network, can have one or more LIO for issuing EIC codes.

 

In addition, an energy association, (such as ENTSO-E, EFET, BDEW, DVGW, etc.) can also become a LIO. The LIO manages the EIC codes it allocates and maintains a local registry.


Level 3: Central Issuing Office (CIO)


The CIO is currently under the direct responsibility of ENTSO-E. It ensures the management of the central registry and the acceptance of LIOs.


Level 4: ENTSO-E

 

ENTSO-E defines after consulting the LIOs the governance of the EIC scheme and maintains the EIC Reference manual.

 

 

Local and International EIC codes 

 

 

EIC codes are assigned at the local as well as at the international level.

 

According to the ENTSO-E Energy Identification Coding Scheme (EIC) Reference Manual of 15 February 2016 Local EIC code is an EIC code allocated for activities limited to an area of operation and is not used in another country.


In turn, International EIC code is an EIC code allocated for activities on one or several geographical area(s), which may cross borders with another country and/or for any other activities outside the limits of this area as subject to publication or reporting requirements pursuant to EU legislation.


The international EIC code are registered in the CIO registry. 

 

The EIC code is unique within the central registry.

 

 

Application of the EIC codes in the European Union Internal Energy Market

 

 

The ENTSO-E Energy Identification Coding Scheme (EIC) Reference Manual of 15 February 2016 evidences the following examples of the application of the EIC codes in the European Union legal framework for energy markets:

 

1. Transparency Regulation (Commission Regulation (EU) No 543/2013 of 14 June 2013 on submission and publication of data in electricity markets and amending Annex I to Regulation (EC) No 714/2009 of the European Parliament and of the Council - the manual of procedures developed by ENTSO-E prescribes the use of EIC codes to report information for the electricity sector (notably EIC codes type X, Y, W, V and T);


2. Gas Regulation (Regulation (EC) No 715/2009 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 13 July 2009 on conditions for access to the natural gas transmission networks and repealing Regulation (EC) No 1775/2005, as modified by Commission Decision of 24 August 2012) - the Automatic Download User Manual developed by ENTSOG pursuant to the Gas Regulation prescribes the use of EIC codes to report information for the gas sector (notably EIC codes types X, Y and Z);


3. REMIT Regulation and the REMIT implementing act (Regulation (EU) No 1277/2011 of the European Parliament and of the Council of October 2011 on wholesale energy market integrity and transparency and the Commission Implementing Regulation (EU) No 1348/2014 of 17 December 2014 on data reporting implementing Article 8(2) and Article 8(6) of Regulation (EU) No 1227/2011 of the European Parliament and of the Council on wholesale energy market integrity and transparency render EIC codes mandatory for both the electricity and the gas sectors:

 

a) EIC codes have to be submitted to report information pursuant to Article 8(2) of the REMIT Regulation (Article 5 and the Annex of the REMIT implementing act):

 

‒ EIC codes identifying the delivery point or zone/areas for contracts related to the supply of electricity and gas (Annex of the REMIT implementing act, Table 1, row 48 and Table 2, row 41),

 

‒  EIC codes type X (identifying the sender of the document, the bidding party, the rights holder, the transferee party and the market participant for whom a bid is submitted) and EIC codes type Y (identifying the “in” and “out” area, both for primary allocation and secondary rights) for contracts related to the transportation of electricity (Annex of the REMIT implementing act, Table 3, rows 4, 16, 19, 20, 33 – 36, and 54),

 

‒  EIC code type Z (identifying the network point) for contracts related to gas (Annex of the REMIT implementing act, Table 4, row 22);

 

b) ENTSO-E and ENTSOG have to report the data under Article 8(5) of the REMIT Regulation through their transparency platforms (Articles 8 and 9 of the REMIT implementing act);

 

c) as EIC codes are to be used to report information on the transparency platforms, they are equally to be used to report information under Article 8(5) of the REMIT Regulation and Articles 8 and 9 of the REMIT implementing act;


d) EIC codes are listed as an option amongst other codes (e.g. Legal Entity Identifier (LEI), Bank Identifier Code (BIC), etc.) to identify information under Article 8(2) of the REMIT Regulation (Article 5 and the Annex of the REMIT implementing act).

 

The list of accepted EIC codes for REMIT transaction reporting purposes is attached to the Annex VI to the REMIT Transaction Reporting User Manual.

 

According to the said ACER's manual no other codes are allowed to be reported under the REMIT reporting scheme.

 

Additional codes that represent delivery points for REMIT transaction reporting purposes currently not listed should be notified to the ACER.

 

As of 1 July 2017 a new validation rule will prevent the reporting of EICs not listed in the ACER’s list of accepted codes.

 

In case any new delivery point or zone has been created, which will be relevant for REMIT transaction reporting purposes, reporting parties should notify them to the ACER using the on line form to update the ARIS validation rules with a least 10 working days’ notice.

 

It means energy market participants need to verify the EIC designations they use in their existing agreements as well as to set up procedures ensuring the proper use of these codes in the future.

 

The necessary element of these procedures is the establishment of the ongoing monitoring of the consistency with the ACER's EIC register.

 

 


 

 

 

 

EIC code types


EIC object type X (Party)


The EIC code of type X is used to identify a Party.


The allocation of an EIC code does not permit a Party to participate in any energy market. The Party has necessarily to be registered in accordance with local market rules of the area where the Party wants to operate.


EIC object type Y (Area)


The EIC code of type Y is used to identify a domain which can be considered as a delimited area that is uniquely identified for a specific purpose and where energy consumption, production or trade may be determined. It can be a geographical or market area, such as control areas, balance groups, bidding zones, balancing areas, etc.


Only system operators, grid operators (distribution operators), market operators, imbalance settlement responsible parties, balance responsible parties, and regulators are allowed to request new EIC area identification codes.


EIC object type Z (Measurement point)

 

The EIC code of type Z is used to identify a physical or logical point that is used to identify an object where the measurement of energy is measured or calculated.


EIC object type W (Resource object)


The EIC code of type W is used to identify objects to be used for production, consumption or storage of energy. Examples are: generation unit, production unit, LNG terminals, gas storages etc. Excluded are the passive elements in the grid, e.g. lines or transformers.


EIC object type T (Tie-line)


The EIC code of type T is used to identify connecting objects such as interconnection lines, lines, busbar-couples, transformers, etc.


EIC object type V (Location)


The EIC code of type V is used to identify a physical or logical place where a Party or an IT system of a Party is or could be located (endpoints, nodes etc.). A location has necessarily an EIC responsible party associated with it.


EIC object Type A (Substations)


The EIC code of type A is used to identify substations.

 

Source: The Energy Identification Coding Scheme (EIC) Reference Manual, ENTSO-E, 2016.02.15, p. 15, 

 

 

 

 

Structure of the EIC code


General


The Energy Identification Coding scheme (EIC) is based on fixed length alphanumeric codes. The EIC codes will contain information about the LIO in addition to information on the object identified.


It is strongly recommended that EIC codes should be non-significant alphanumeric codes. This maintains the uniqueness of the code and stability of the coding system. Examples: 



 

- of a random non-significant code: 10X1680A248;


- of a non-random significant code: 10X---ENTSOE--3.

 

Permitted characters

 

Permitted characters are numbers (0 to 9), capital letters (A to Z, English alphabet) and the sign minus (-). To avoid confusion, the check character shall use numbers (0 to 9) or the capital letters (A to Z).


Overall structure

 

The structure of the EIC may be broken down as follows:


- The 2-characters identifying the LIO, as assigned by the CIO.


- One character identifying the object type that the EIC code represents.

 

- 12 digits, uppercase characters or minus signs allocated by the LIO in compliance with general and local rules to identify the object in question (party, measurement point, area, etc.). This implies that the significance of these 12 characters shall always remain constant.

 

- 1 check character based on the 15 previous characters used to ensure the validity of the EIC code. The check digit algorithm is described in the EIC implementation guide document, which is available in the EIC website.

 

Structure of other attributes

 

The display name should have a maximum length of 16 character.

 

The permitted letters are the uppercase characters “A” to “Z”, the minus sign “-“, the plus sign “+”, the underscore sign “_”, or the numeric values “0” to “9”.

 

Each Display name assigned by a LIO must be unique within the LIO's registry and the central (CIO) registry.

 

This uniqueness should be guaranteed only within codes of the same EIC type.

 

Source: The Energy Identification Coding Scheme (EIC) Reference Manual, ENTSO-E, 2016.02.15, p. 15, 16

 

 

 

Documentation

 

 

Full list of Y-Z-W EIC codes available on ENTSO-E website

 

Energy Identification Codes (EIC) Documentation

 

The Energy Identification Coding Scheme (EIC) Reference Manual, ENTSO-E, 2016.02.15

 

REMIT Transaction Reporting User Manual Annex VI Additional information on how to correctly report the Delivery point or zone

 

 

 

 

 

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Last Updated on Thursday, 08 June 2017 23:47
 

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