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Governance of the Energy Union
European Union Electricity Market Glossary

 

 

 

Winter Energy Package of November 2016 consists, inter alia, of the draft Proposal for a Regulation of the European Parliament and of the Council on the Governance of the Energy Union, amending Directive 94/22/EC, Directive 98/70/EC, Directive 2009/31/EC, Regulation (EC) No 663/2009, Regulation (EC) No 715/2009, Directive 2009/73/EC, Council Directive 2009/119/EC, Directive 2010/31/EU, Directive 2012/27/EU, Directive 2013/30/EU and Council Directive (EU) 2015/652 and repealing Regulation (EU) No 525/2013, 30.11.2016, COM(2016) 759 final 2016/0375 (COD).

 

The proposal aims to simplify the process of monitoring progress and addressing weaknesses in implementing the goals of Energy Union, in particular the 2030 EU targets on renewables, energy efficiency and greenhouse gas emissions.

 

National energy and climate plans are to be prepared for the 2021-2030 period, followed by progress reports.

 

Both plans and reports will use binding templates, and gain early input from the Commission.

 

The proposed regulation envisages national and EU registries and inventories on greenhouse gas emissions for the post-2020 period as a means to assess progress in meeting the goals of the Paris Climate Change Agreement.

 

The proposal obliges each EU Member State to produce an integrated national plan for energy and climate by 1 January 2019, covering the 2021-2030 period.

 

A binding template is provided in the annex to the draft regulation.

 

The draft regulation envisages further ten-year plans covering the periods 2031-2040 and 2041-2050, in order to meet the goals of the EU energy roadmap for 2050.

 

National plans are to be updated every five years (first update by 1 January 2024).

 

The regulation would be directly applicable in Member States, thereby ensuring comparability in their national energy and climate plans and reports. The regulation would enable national plans to be in place by 1 January 2021.

 

The planning, reporting and monitoring obligations of the EU energy and climate acquis are currently disperwe’d across a wide range of legislation, approved at diferent times in order to meet various objectives.

 

Each item of legislation tends to have its own set of such obligations.

 

Separate reporting requirements currently exist for all key legislation under the energy and climate acquis.

 

On 11 January 2018 the Committee on the Environment, Public Health and Food Safety (ENVI) and Committee on Industry, Research and Energy (ITRE) adopted a joint report on the proposal on governance of the Energy Union (A8-0402/2017).A8-0402/2017).

 

They propose to increase the frequency of the integrated plans, oblige these to include provisions on energy poverty, plan for a longer-term perspective (until 2050), and facilitate regional cooperation on RES infrastructure.

 

 

 

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Governance of the Energy Union, European Parliament Briefing, EU legislation in progress, p. 6, 7

 

The changes the proposal would bring

 

The Commission proposal integrates 31 planning, reporting and monitoring obligations, and deletes a further 23 obligations.

 

It integrates (and therefore repeals) the Climate Monitoring Mechanism Regulation (MMR), ensuring a closer alignment between energy and climate goals.

 

It also provides that future EU planning and reporting obligations be adjusted to the global implementation of the Paris Agreement on Climate Change.

 

The proposal obliges each Member State to produce an integrated National Plan for energy and climate by 1 January 2019, covering the 2021-2030 period.

 

A binding template is provided in the annex.

 

The regulation envisages further ten-year plans covering the periods 2031-2040 and 2041-2050, in order to meet the goals of the EU energy roadmap for 2050.

 

National plans are to be updated every five years (frst update by 1 January 2024).

 

Member States are asked to provide draft plans by 1 January 2018 (and thereafter at ten-year intervals), allowing time for the Commission to make recommendations and propose adjustments to meet overall EU targets for 2030.

 

This consideration is particularly important because the EU proposes to set collective targets on renewables and energy efficiency by 2030, but without setting additional targets that are binding on individual countries.

 

Member States are asked to provide early and efective opportunities for public consultation in preparing their draft plans, and attach a summary of public views to their submissions.

 

Member States are asked to consult with each other on draft plans (regional cooperation), and explain the outcomes of these consultations.

 

Member States are asked to produce detailed progress reports on implementation of their national plans every two years.

 

The first progress reports would be due in 2023.

 

They should cover all five dimensions of the energy union strategy, and also explain how Member States are meeting the goals set out in the Paris Climate Change Agreement.

 

The regulation lists the integrated reporting requirements that Member States must comply with in the felds of climate change, renewable energy, energy efficiency, energy security, internal energy market, research, innovation and competitiveness.

 

The Commission also requests Member States to give annual updates in specifc areas including GHG emissions, use of ETS revenues, and support to developing countries to mitigate climate change.

 

The regulation asks Member States to report their long-term low emissions strategies by 1 January 2020 (and every 10 years thereafter).

 

These strategies should have a 50-year perspective and align with international climate change goals, as set out in the Paris Climate Change Agreement and through its future implementation.

 

The regulation also empowers the Commission to request additional measures from Member States in the event that the 2030 climate and energy goals risk not being met.

 

To this end, the Commission may request Member States to adjust the share of renewable energy used in their heating and cooling, and transport sectors, and/or contribute fnancially towards setting up a financing platform at EU level to develop renewable energy projects. Member States would be required to contribute to this fnancing platform if they fail to meet their baseline share of energy from renewable sources.

 

The Commission would also be empowered to pass further measures on the energy efciency of products and buildings, largely by making use of its existing powers to adopt delegated acts in these areas.

 

The regulation sets out the requirements for national and EU inventory systems for GHG emissions, policies, measures and projections in the post-2020 period.

 

Member States must establish their national inventory systems by 1 January 2021.

 

The regulation also provides the legal basis for establishing national and EU registries to account for the nationally determined contributions following from the Paris Climate Change Agreement.

 

With this in mind, the regulation requests annual reporting by Member States on GHG emissions and related environmental issues from 2021 onwards.

 

The regulation confers new powers on the Commission to adopt delegated acts.

 

These would apply to the following parts of the regulation: amending the binding templates for national plans and progress reports; amending the list of GHGs and adapting inventory systems to new international guidelines; taking additional measures to ensure that Member States meet their collective renewable energy targets (see above); and changes to national or EU inventory systems and/or registries.

 

The conferral of powers on the Commission to adopt delegated acts would be for an initial period of five years and tacitly extended for periods of an identical duration.

 

It could be revoked at any time by the Council or the Parliament, and should be reviewed by the Commission after a period of four years.

 

The Council and Parliament can also object to any particular delegated act within two months of notifcation and thereby prevent its entry into force.

 

The regulation introduces an obligation for the Commission to produce an annual State of the Energy Union report by 31 October.

 

This would regularise existing practice, whereby the Commission has sought to deliver such a report on a roughly annual basis (the first was in November 2015, the second in February 2017).

 

The regulation would establish an Energy Union committee composed of representatives from Member States and chaired by the Commission, to assist the latter in its work.

 

The regulation calls for technical assistance from the European Environmental Agency in collecting data from Member States and performing quality assurance and control.

 

All provisions of this regulation would become fully applicable by 1 January 2021.

 

The regulation would be subject to a formal review by 28 February 2026 and thereafter every five years.

 

The Commission could opt to review it earlier if this is necessary to meet energy and climate goals.

 

 

 

 

 

 

IMG 0744

    Documentation    

 

 

 

 

 

20 June 2018 - political agreement on the governance of the Energy Union was reached between negotiators from the Commission, the European Parliament and the Council

 

Amendments adopted by the European Parliament on 17 January 2018 on the proposal for a regulation of the European Parliament and of the Council on the Governance of the Energy Union, amending Directive 94/22/EC, Directive 98/70/EC, Directive 2009/31/EC, Regulation (EC) No 663/2009, Regulation (EC) No 715/2009, Directive 2009/73/EC, Council Directive 2009/119/EC, Directive 2010/31/EU, Directive 2012/27/EU, Directive 2013/30/EU and Council Directive (EU) 2015/652 and repealing Regulation (EU) No 525/2013 (COM(2016)0759 – C8-0497/2016 – 2016/0375(COD))

 

Report of 11 January 2018 of the Committee on the Environment, Public Health and Food Safety (ENVI) and Committee on Industry, Research and Energy (ITRE) on the proposal on governance of the Energy Union (A8-0402/2017)

 

Proposal for a Regulation of the European Parliament and of the Council on the Governance of the Energy Union, amending Directive 94/22/EC, Directive 98/70/EC, Directive 2009/31/EC, Regulation (EC) No 663/2009, Regulation (EC) No 715/2009, Directive 2009/73/EC, Council Directive 2009/119/EC, Directive 2010/31/EU, Directive 2012/27/EU, Directive 2013/30/EU and Council Directive (EU) 2015/652 and repealing Regulation (EU) No 525/2013, 30.11.2016, COM(2016) 759 final 2016/0375 (COD) and Annexes

 

Governance of the Energy Union, European Parliament Briefing, EU legislation in progress

 

 

 

 

  

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    Links    

 

 

 

 

Legislative observatory file (OEIL) on the Governance of the Energy Union, Procedure 2016/0375(COD)

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Last Updated on Friday, 22 June 2018 21:43
 

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